Testimonials


"I have been living at WillBridge’s Mission St. house since September 2011. From the beginning of my stay at WillBridge, the residents and staff have been so warm and helpful, taking time to consider my needs. I believe that WillBridge has given me the step-up I have needed since being released from State Prison.
Though I was born and raised in Santa Barbara, upon my release I had nowhere to live, no plans, not a clue to what I should do, or where I could go. Due to the relationship between WillBridge and the Day Reporting Center, who helps parolees upon their release from prison, I was able to find a place where I could live. At WillBridge I worked with my case manager to put together an action plan of steps I needed to make to move forward with my life, and make the positive changes I needed to make, so I wouldn’t make the same mistakes I’ve made in the past. I am now able to focus on the positive goals of getting my life back together. In fact, just within the last two weeks my Social Security Disability benefits were approved. This gives me the finances I need to move on to independent living and a place of my own. My biggest issue today is finding affordable housing, but I know that with the assistance of WillBridge, I feel I can meet that challenge – I now have HOPE. I sincerely thank WillBridge for all they have done for me." -Maria

“…There is a sense of freedom yet belonging. There are no rigid rules; instead there are velvet cords. With only 12 beds, the place is small enough to get to know each other and the staff… This is transitional living in a family-like situation. The home is run under the best Christian thinking; the Christianity is through attraction by actions rather than aggressive apostleship. It is hard to find a permanent home on limited income and it is harder still because WillBridge is so comfortable and supportive.” -Bob

"I moved to Santa Barbara 5 years ago and when I got here I was homeless for a couple of years. After several run ins with law enforcement, Police Officer Keld Hove brought me to WillBridge and the Program Director Crystle Murphy gave me a chance.
I have been at WillBridge since March 2013 in the last year and a half I feel I have gotten my sense of purpose and well-being in order. WillBridge helped me stay of drugs and alcohol. The program also allows me to give back to the community by volunteering with our Street Outreach Team. I was recently hired as the Resident Manager for the Mission Street House and I am a better person physically and mentally because of the support and encouragement I receive at WillBridge." -Larita aka Zion

“I had gone to Cottage Hospital to be treated for my alcoholism and I really wanted to be rescued from my homelessness. I did not know anything about WillBridge, but when the Doctor offered me housing I said “yes.” I abandoned WillBridge after a month and went back to living and sleeping in the streets drinking between 20 and 25 beers daily. I was on a three week bender that culminated in my ending up in a detox program at the local shelter. I returned to WillBridge, living there is pretty easy. Oh! We are expected to do our chores and follow through with whatever our personal goals are. WillBridge is a place to recover from mental health problems, medical conditions and substance abuse. This time I am trying to stay focused, but it’s tricky …I have been diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Bipolar 2 Disorder and Attention Deficit Disorder – The A.D.D. has been a real problem for me lately…” -Robert

"I’ve been at WillBridge less than a month. When I first found out I’d been accepted at WillBridge I cried. I’d been sleeping in my car at a campground which was causing further injury to my hip and sleeping in empty houses. At night I thank God I have a bed to sleep on and I know I’ll wake up where there will be food. I’m still adjusting, I’m trying to understand for this time I safe and not in survival mode. I am at the right place to get help, back on my feet, physically well health and independent.” -Kathleen

“In the summer of 2006 I was looking for live bait in the Goleta Slough when a rock I was standing on split in two dropping me approximately seven feet down. Jagged rip rap rock slicing my legs and toes and cutting my little toe like a flower…The next day I would have to have my toe amputated…During my recovery my Case Worker asked me If I would like to go to WillBridge…I did and now I have a job at WillBridge and a nice warm place to stay…Being homeless, it is a God send and a pleasure to do what I can to contribute to this wonderful idea of WillBridge.” -Mike

"Living at WillBridge has allowed me to be myself and only then could I get to the heart of the matter. I have accomplished more in the four months I have lived here than I ever dreamed possible. I am actually a functioning person. Because of the direction I now receive. I am on the right path and now see a future for myself. WillBridge has done all this for me.” -Liz

I had gone to Cottage Hospital to be treated for my alcoholism and I really wanted to be rescued from my homelessness. I did not know anything about WillBridge, but when the Doctor offered me housing I said “yes.” I specifically remember Lynnelle driving me to take care of my business, buying me three packs of cigarettes, making my bed and that it was two weeks before I stopped shaking as I detoxed with Librium. I abandoned WillBridge after a month and went back to living and sleeping in the streets drinking between 20 and 25 beers daily. I was on a 3 week bender that culminated in my ending up in a detox program at the local shelter. I returned to WillBridge, living there is pretty easy. Oh! We are expected to do our chores and follow through with whatever our personal goals are. WillBridge is a place to recover from mental health problems, medical conditions and substance abuse. This time I am trying to stay focused, but it’s tricky. I comply with my psychiatrist, visit my doctor to treat my HIV, attend Alcoholics Anonymous to prevent relapse and attend computer classes at the Schott Center. I have been diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Bipolar 2 Disorder and Attention Deficit Disorder – The A.D.D. has been a real problem for me lately…”
Robert C.
In the summer of 2006 I was looking for live bait in the Goleta Slough when a rock I was standing on split in two dropping me approximately seven feet down. Jagged rip rap rock slicing my legs and toes and cutting my little toe like a flower…The next day I would have to have my toe amputated…During my recovery my Case Worker asked me If I would like to go to WillBridge…I did and now I have a job at WillBridge and a nice warm place to stay…Being homeless it is a God send and a pleasure to do what I can to contribute to this wonderful idea of WillBridge.
Mike
Living at WillBridge has allowed me to be myself and only then could I get to the heart of the matter. I have accomplished more in the four months I have lived here than I ever dreamed possible. I am actually a functioning person. Because of the direction I now receive I am on the right path and now see a future for myself. WillBridge has done all this for me.
Liz
I had gone to Cottage Hospital to be treated for my alcoholism and I really wanted to be rescued from my homelessness. I did not know anything about WillBridge, but when the Doctor offered me housing I said “yes.” I abandoned WillBridge after a month and went back to living and sleeping in the streets drinking between 20 and 25 beers daily. I was on a three week bender that culminated in my ending up in a detox program at the local shelter. I returned to WillBridge, living there is pretty easy. Oh! We are expected to do our chores and follow through with whatever our personal goals are. WillBridge is a place to recover from mental health problems, medical conditions and substance abuse. This time I am trying to stay focused, but it’s tricky …I have been diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Bipolar 2 Disorder and Attention Deficit Disorder – The A.D.D. has been a real problem for me lately…
Robert
I’ve been at WillBridge less than a month. When I first found out I’d been accepted at WillBridge I cried. I’d been sleeping in my car at a campground which was causing further injury to my hip and sleeping in empty houses. At night I thank God I have a bed to sleep on and a I know I’ll wake up where there will be food. I’m still adjusting I’m trying to understand for this time I safe and not in survival mode. I need help to get back n my feet to get health and independent.
Kathleen
…There is a sense of freedom yet belonging. There are no rigid rules; instead there are velvet cords. With only 12 beds, the place is small enough to get to know each other and the staff… This is transitional living in a family-like situation. The home is run under the best Christian thinking; the Christianity is through attraction by actions rather than aggressive apostleship. It is hard to find a permanent home on limited income and it is harder still because WillBridge is so comfortable and supportive. P.S. I could do without the barking dog!
Bob